MSCI Curriculum

MSCI students must complete 10 units to receive their degree. These include 6 core credits, 2 elective credits and 2 research project credits. 

Core Curriculum

MSCI students must take all eight of these courses.

Course Listing and Name

Description

Units

Term Offered

Instructor

MSCI 311 - Clinical Research, Design, Methods, and Grant Writing This multidisciplinary course will introduce MSCI students to scientific methods used for clinical translational research as well as provide a framework for the other courses required for completing the MSCI degree. The course will stress the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to solving clinical questions and will incorporate examples of research discoveries that were advanced through multidisciplinary collaborations. 1.0 Winter and Summer

Andrew Naidech

Brian Hitsman

MSCI 321 - Biostatistics for Clinical Investigators 1 This course focuses on applications and interpretations of the general linear model, including t-tests, regression and ANOVA. Additionally, logistic regression and other categorical data analysis techniques are explored. The use of SPSS is a course requirement. 1.0 Fall John Gatta
MSCI 322 - Introduction to Epidemiology This course is an introduction to the field of epidemiology and its application. Epidemiology is the study of the distributionof disease and determinants of disease in human populations. The most commonly used study designs in epidemiology are observational rather than experimental. 1.0 Winter Ravi Kalhan
MSCI 335 - Data Science Students will learn the ethics, principles and conduct of clinical trials for medical research.  The protection of study participants and the need for equipoise will be covered, including regulatory restrictions and the latest patient privacy regulations for the dissemination and use of data associated with the participants in clinical trials. 1.0 Spring Michael Fleming
MSCI 421 - Biostatistics for Clinical Investigators 2 This coursebuilds upon the material learned in Intermediate Biostatistics. Specifically, this course will focus on model-building techniques including linear regression, logistic regression, Cox proportional hazards regression, generalized estimating equations, and other special topics. Prerequisites: MSCI 321 or PH 302 Introduction to Biostatistics. 1.0 Spring John Gatta
MSCI 445 - Writing and Peer Reviewing for Publication This is an intensive, hands-on, advanced course in writing for publication in biomedical journals and how to be a successful peer reviewer. The student will be expected to prepare an article, respond to 2 peer review cycles, and at the conclusion of the course, to be ready to submit to a journal.Prerequisites: MSCI 321 Introduction to Biostatistics and PH 304 Introduction to Epidemiology. 1.0 Fall and Summer

Denise Drane

Philip Greenland

MSCI 450 - Key Issues in the Responsible Conduct of Research The overall goal of this course is to cover core principles and expectations for conducting medical research ethically and responsibly. The course will meet the NIH requirements for RCR training for individuals whose research is funded on public funds. It is expected that at the end of the course trainees with have a thorough understanding of research ethics. 0.0 Spring Brian Hitsman
MSCI 499 - Research Project Development and presentation of a research project while participating in the program. Students present a seminar on the project, prepare a grant application,and submit a manuscript for publication. Read more. 2.0    

Elective Curriculum

Two electives are required. Electives may be chosen from the offerings here or be selected from courses offered through The Graduate School (TGS). Typically students who fulfill elective requirements through TGS choose courses in the Public Health program. Courses taken through The Graduate School must be approved by the MSCI advisor.

See TGS course listings for more information about offerings outside MSCI.

Course Listing and Name

Description

Units

Term Offered

Instructor

MSCI 422 - Introduction to Translational Research This course is intended to introduce the basic life sciences graduate student to the thought processes involved in human disease research and its translation into therapy by providing an overview of disease processes, how they are treated, and how basic biological science is used to develop those treatments. 1.0 Summer

David Johnson

William Schnaper

MSCI 490 - Independent Research Permission of instructor or department required. More details 1.0